Medic reducing A&E admissions, take our special offer first aid training !

Register Course Interest

The life of the party? CPR is an ideal guest

The life of the party? CPR is an ideal guest

I threw a dinner party and almost killed one of my guests.

One minute we were eating and talking, the next minute someone was choking, unable to breathe, and all I could do was sit there frozen. I had no idea what to do.

Thank goodness, one man did. He quickly performed the Heimlich maneuver, and the guest’s life was saved.

Everyone was grateful and hugely relieved, of course, but I couldn’t help thinking how abysmally useless I had been. How could I not know a basic lifesaving skill?

It turns out that I’m typical of many Americans who don’t know the simple ways a bystander can save another person’s life.

Obviously, calling 911 is the first thing to do – something else my stunned self didn’t remember, although someone else did – because often the dispatcher can coach you through what’s needed before professional help arrives.

But sometimes that’s not possible or easy and, unfortunately, time is of the essence: Brain cells start to die after less than five minutes without oxygen, which can cause permanent brain damage.

The American Heart Association and some hospitals are pushing to make lifesaving techniques easier and more convenient to learn. Choking kills about 5,000 Americans annually, while about 450,000 Americans die of cardiac arrest, mostly at home, work or in public rather than at a hospital. For both types of emergency, bystander help can be the difference between life and death.

Since my dinner-party crisis, I’ve made it a point to get trained, and it’s really not that hard: For a person who is conscious but choking, the simplest and most effective action is the Heimlich maneuver, a series of abdominal thrusts invented by thoracic surgeon Henry Heimlich. Here’s what you do:

– From behind, wrap your arms around the person’s waist.

– Make a fist and place the thumb side in the middle of the victim’s abdomen, just above the navel.

– Grasp your fist with your other hand, press hard into the abdomen and give a quick upward thrust into the upper abdomen, as if you were trying to lift the person. Repeat until object is expelled.

The American Red Cross recommends first bending the person over and giving them five back blows with the heel of the hand followed by five abdominal thrusts, but Heimlich vehemently disagreed with that advice, and other experts, such as the heart association, say back blows can be skipped.

For a person who starts choking and then loses consciousness, however, CPR must be started, which bring us to another lifesaving technique that not enough Americans know.

“Fewer than 1 in 5 Americans has current hands-only CPR training. It should be right up there with learning to swim – a basic skill everyone should know,” said emergency medicine physician Benjamin Abella with the Center for Resuscitation Science at the University of Pennsylvania.

In the case of cardiac arrest because of choking or because a malfunction in the heart’s electrical activity leads the heart to stop abruptly, it is most often CPR from a bystander that saves the person’s life, he said. And yet less than 3 percent of Americans receive CPR training annually, leaving many bystanders unprepared to respond, according to a 2015 Institute of Medicine report that urged hands-only CPR training be made a national priority.

“Without treatment within 10 minutes, the survival rate (for cardiac arrest) is almost zero,” the panel of experts wrote.

More troubling are American Heart Association statistics that show three times as many Americans avoided performing CPR to save someone’s life last year despite knowing how. The association’s survey of nearly 1,200 adults trained in CPR found that 13 percent had the opportunity to perform CPR in 2016 but didn’t; in 2014, it was only 4 percent. Respondents said fear of legal ramifications and harming the person were the top reasons for their hesitation, even though good Samaritan laws generally protect a person from getting sued if they were acting in good faith to save someone’s life.

The rate of up-to-date CPR training remains low, especially among older Americans, according to a new study by Abella and a team of researchers. The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, found that those older than 60 were about 50 percent less likely to be trained in CPR compared with those 49 and younger.

“It’s a double threat. People in their 60s and 70s are more likely to have cardiac arrest and less likely to be trained,” Abella said.

And while more young adults are learning CPR, thanks to a growing number of states that make it mandatory in high school, “I worry about a 65-year-old spouse having cardiac arrest at home with a similarly aged spouse who doesn’t know CPR,” he added.

“The lack of people knowing hands-only CPR has frustrated me my entire professional career,” said cardiologist Holly Andersen, director of education and outreach at the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. “Needless lives are lost, and it’s so simple. Thirty seconds and we can show you what to do.”

Her frustration is personal: Her older brother died of cardiac arrest seven years ago at age 50, shortly after returning home from coaching his son’s soccer game.

And while older adults are more at risk, it can happen to younger people, including kids playing sports. “But they can be saved if we get people to act,” Andersen said. “They don’t need to go to a class or get certified. Our videos stress how using your hands can save a life.”

Simple hands-only CPR involves basically two steps:

Call 911 (or tell someone to do it for you).

Place one hand over the other and place them on the person’s chest, between the nipples. Use your upper body weight to push hard, without stopping, for 100 compressions per minute until help arrives. (You can pace yourself by doing it to the rhythm of the Bee Gees’ “Stayin’ Alive”).

To stress how easy it is to learn, New York-Presbyterian has been promoting its 30-second “Everyone Can Save a Life” video on social media and online, along with a 40-song playlist of memorable songs at the perfect 100 beats a minute. (The hospital uses “Stayin’ Alive” to train first responders, but the playlist also includes songs by Justin Timberlake, Lady Gaga, Beyoncé and others.)

Showing hands-only CPR videos at Mets Stadium and Times Square is in the works, Andersen said, and she’s talking to some airlines about showing the video to their passengers. A European cardiology task force proposed new guidelines to train airline personnel in how to treat such emergencies, following the death of actress Carrie Fisher last year after suffering cardiac arrest on a flight to Los Angeles.

Andersen and Abella worry that too few Americans realize that mouth-to-mouth resuscitation is no longer necessary for CPR on adults, thanks to a change in guidelines in 2008. That could be one reason Americans hesitate about getting trained.

“It’s a question I get all the time. People are worried about whether they need to do the breaths,” said Manny Medina, a CPR instructor with the American Heart Association in San Diego.

The other common worries he hears from people: “That they’ll hurt the person, maybe crack a rib from pressing on their chest. And that they’ll get sued.”

Medina reassures them that no mouth-to-mouth is required, just the hands-only technique. In fact, what’s most important in reducing cardiac arrest deaths is starting those compressions as soon as possible. Doing something is better than doing nothing, he tells them.

“And I tell them that a person would rather wake up with a cracked rib from someone performing CPR than to never wake up again.”

(c) 2017, The Washington Post.

 

The UK’s Leading CPR, Medical and Industrial First Aid Training Provider

Our Qualified Senior Doctors, Paramedics and Nurses are delivering courses every week around the UK

Book a Course
Find Out More

Looking to arrange your CPR Training, First Aid Training, or Basic Life Support Training, then look no further. Trust our Senior Doctors
and Nurses.

Pulse Medic Services has grown to become the UK’s most popular First-Aid Training provider.

travel icon

We will travel to your location to deliver courses for groups of eight or more.

car icon

Our courses can be tailored to any industry, construction, healthcare, science and more.

training icon

We have our own training suites all around the UK.

specialist icon

All of our specialist trainsers are HSE Accredited Qualified Senior Doctors, Paramedics and Nurses.

Online Courses

All of our online courses are delivered using both practical and theoretical principles. We ensure every course is interactive, fun and easy to follow

Find Out More

Our Clients Include

WPP Group
Guide Dogs
Centerplate
University of East London
United House

“Thank you Pulse for a fantastic training session! My managers were so impressed with your team’s professionalism & delivery”

Paul Clarke, PMG

“Thanks Martin & Michael, I feel more confident after my CPR session and can’t wait to do my First Aid Course”

Dawn, Thomas Grant School

Trust Badge ContentTake a look at more of our feedback

PulseMedic the class of Microsoft 2016-2017

PulseMedic is focused on leading and learning.

PulseMedic has been recognized as a global leader in the successful integration of technology with teaching and learning.

PulseMedic joins the Microsoft Schools Program, an exclusive community of more than 1,000 premier schools from around the world, recognized to celebrate their pioneering efforts and innovation in rethinking teaching, learning, and assessment with the intent to drive deep 21st century competencies.

PulseMedic joins the program for the 2016-2017 school year because they identify themselves as engaging with Microsoft in some capacity and is signaling an intent to explore programs, resources, and professional learning opportunities further.

As frontline medics, we at PulseMedic are leveraging technology in unique/innovative ways. “Becoming a part of the Microsoft Schools program is an amazing opportunity to connect and engage with over 1,000 leaders in education around the world,” said Marin at PulseMedic. “We look forward to sharing our experiences with other schools in our community and the world to continue finding innovative ways to equip our students with the proper tools needed for success inside and outside of the classroom.”

As well as being recognized on a global scale for their innovative approach to educating tomorrow’s workforce, Microsoft Schools receive additional collaboration opportunities with other schools around the world, access to professional development opportunities, access to Microsoft Innovative Educators Experts (MIE Experts) on staff to help drive innovation and to support staff, peers and students, and more.

Charlotte, Cath, James: Can be contacted at

03300431316

Home

The UK’s Leading CPR, Medical and Industrial First Aid Training Provider

Our Qualified Senior Doctors, Paramedics and Nurses are delivering courses every week around the UK

Book a Course
Find Out More

Looking to arrange your CPR Training, First Aid Training, or Basic Life Support Training, then look no further. Trust our Senior Doctors
and Nurses.

Pulse Medic Services has grown to become the UK’s most popular First-Aid Training provider.

travel icon

We will travel to your location to deliver courses for groups of eight or more.

car icon

Our courses can be tailored to any industry, construction, healthcare, science and more.

training icon

We have our own training suites all around the UK.

specialist icon

All of our specialist trainsers are HSE Accredited Qualified Senior Doctors, Paramedics and Nurses.

Online Courses

All of our online courses are delivered using both practical and theoretical principles. We ensure every course is interactive, fun and easy to follow

Find Out More

Our Clients Include

WPP Group
Guide Dogs
Centerplate
University of East London
United House

“Thank you Pulse for a fantastic training session! My managers were so impressed with your team’s professionalism & delivery”

Paul Clarke, PMG

“Thanks Martin & Michael, I feel more confident after my CPR session and can’t wait to do my First Aid Course”

Dawn, Thomas Grant School

Trust Badge ContentTake a look at more of our feedback

Why does it matter ars longa, vita brevis?

Everybody was sure that Somebody would do it. Anybody would have done it, but not Everybody did it. Somebody got angry because it was Everybody’s job.

Everybody thought Anybody would do it, but Nobody realised that Anybody wouldn’t do it. It ended up that Everybody, blamed Somebody when Nobody did, what Anybody could have done.

Everybody Busy, Everybody was sure that Somebody would do it.

Health humanities allows us to think more clearly, critically and creatively about the individual experience of health and illness. This focus on what it means to be sick or well distinguishes an arts-and humanities-based approach to health from more conventional approaches to health studies. What’s important to understand is that this does not mean that the arts and humanities are “better” or more important than biological or physiological knowledge of health. My own background is in clinical epidemiology and geriatrics, and I work closely with colleagues in the Faculty of Medicine.

What health humanities uniquely shows us is that the arts and humanities have something to teach us about the complex lived experience of health and illness. The arts and humanities are really good at helping us investigate and imagine ways into that complexity, which is often profoundly unique from person to person. The effects of health policy or illness experiences are often profoundly personal. If we only focus on the “bigger picture” of health, that individual perspective goes missing. That’s why health humanities matters.

Why now?

Health humanities has been around for about 40 years, mostly in medical schools where the arts have been employed to enhance the teaching of clinical skills like compassion and empathy. But the relationship between arts and medicine is an ancient one. Hippocrates, the founder of modern western medicine, famously wrote ars longa, vita brevis, art is long and life is short, in the document we now call the Hippocratic Oath.

What attracts PulseMedic to health humanities is how it asks researchers and educators to think about the relationship between the creative imagination of health and illness, and how those ideas get put to work in the “real world.”

What are the relationships between body, health, mobility and urban environments? What happens when these connections are out of balance? And how do traffic and mobility—by vehicle or bicycle—fit into this equation?

A quote from Chaplin to remember. The aeroplane and the radio have brought us closer together. The very nature of these inventions cries out for the goodness in men – cries out for universal brotherhood – for the unity of us all. Get to know one another first aid is more than health.

PulseMedic

The UK’s Leading CPR, Medical and Industrial First Aid Training Provider

Our Qualified Senior Doctors, Paramedics and Nurses are delivering courses every week around the UK

Book a Course
Find Out More

Looking to arrange your CPR Training, First Aid Training, or Basic Life Support Training, then look no further. Trust our Senior Doctors
and Nurses.

Pulse Medic Services has grown to become the UK’s most popular First-Aid Training provider.

travel icon

We will travel to your location to deliver courses for groups of eight or more.

car icon

Our courses can be tailored to any industry, construction, healthcare, science and more.

training icon

We have our own training suites all around the UK.

specialist icon

All of our specialist trainsers are HSE Accredited Qualified Senior Doctors, Paramedics and Nurses.

Online Courses

All of our online courses are delivered using both practical and theoretical principles. We ensure every course is interactive, fun and easy to follow

Find Out More

Our Clients Include

WPP Group
Guide Dogs
Centerplate
University of East London
United House

“Thank you Pulse for a fantastic training session! My managers were so impressed with your team’s professionalism & delivery”

Paul Clarke, PMG

“Thanks Martin & Michael, I feel more confident after my CPR session and can’t wait to do my First Aid Course”

Dawn, Thomas Grant School

Trust Badge ContentTake a look at more of our feedback

Pulse Medic is rated 4.76 stars by Reviews.co.uk based on 254 merchant reviews

4.76 / 5 Rating
254 Reviews
ILS went really well thank you. Just to give some feedback, Martin the course trainer was brilliant. I have been on ILS courses before and have found the trainers to be a little full on and not really understand care giving and emergencies outside of acute NHS Hospital trusts. Martin understood the skills (and resources available) of nursing staff working in primary care in independent sectors and the situations that they may face.
Interactive relax informer time
Martin was so nice and lovely he was the best